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How the compression of photos and videos on Instagram affects you: comparison iPhone vs Android

How the compression of photos and videos affects you on Instagram: comparison iPhone vs Android

Unless you live under a stone and do not use social networks, you will know that all, absolutely all platforms, apply compression to the content you upload to them. Even if you use the best camera on the market to publish your best photos on Instagram, the network will compress it so that it can be downloaded on all possible devices without ending the data rate of your followers. Today we wanted to investigate further how evident is this compression and, incidentally, see if there is differences between uploading content from an iPhone or from an Android smartphone.

To do this, before we start, we put you in context. We have created a new Instagram account to upload the publications that you are going to see below, which have been Taken with a Samsung Galaxy S7 edge and an iPhone 8 Plus, both with the Instagram app updated to the latest version available today. Subsequently, we have downloaded the files from the Instagram servers and we have compared them with the originals. They have had 12 different shots in the same light conditions and the same scenario, which are the following:

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Photo compression on Instagram

Photos taken with the smartphone camera app

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • Original file: 3.8 MB – 4,032 x 3,024 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 88.8 KB – 1,080 x 810 pixels.

iPhone 8 Plus

  • Original file: 2.16 MB – 4,032 x 3,024 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 130 kb – 1,080 x 810 pixels.

Photos taken with the Instagram camera

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • Original file: 1.6 MB – 2,160 x 2,880 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 97.3 KB – 1,080 x 1,080 pixels.

Instagram camera iPhone 8 Plus

  • Original file: 2.5 MB – 3,024 x 4,032 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 172 KB – 1,080 x 1,080 pixels.

Instagram video compression

Videos recorded with the smartphone camera

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • Original file: 22 MB – 1,920 x 1,080 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 479 KB – 640 x 360 pixels.

iPhone 8 Plus

  • Original file: 16.4 MB – 1,920 x 1,080 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 759 KB – 640 x 360 pixels.

Videos recorded with the Instagram camera

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • Original file: 4.64 MB – 720 x 720 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 780 KB – 640 x 640 pixels.

iPhone 8 Plus

  • Original file: 4.78 MB – 720 x 720 pixels.
  • ZIP file: 678 KB – 640 x 640 pixels.

Comparison table of sizes and resolutions of photos and videos

Photo compression on Instagram Stories

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • File size and weight: 369 KB – 1,080 x 1,920 pixels

iPhone 8 Plus

  • File size and weight: 1.4 MB – 1,080 x 1,920 pixels

Video compression in Instagram Stories

Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • File size and weight: 5.3 MB – 1,080 x 1,920 pixels

iPhone 8 Plus

  • File size and weight: 4.04 MB – 1,080 x 1,920 pixels

Comparison table of weight and size of Instagram Stories

What if the photo was taken with a reflex camera?

There has been a lot of talk about Instagram processes worse the images taken with an external camera (see a reflex) and uploaded with an Android than if it is uploaded with an iPhone We have done the test, and we must say that, indeed, it is so.

Photo taken with a Nikon D3300

  • Original file: 17.2 MB – 6,000 x 4,000 pixels

Upload to Instagram with an iPhone 8 Plus

  • File size and weight: 78.5 KB – 1,080 x 720 pixels

Uploading to Instagram with a Samsung Galaxy S7 edge

  • File size and weight: 62.4 KB – 1,080 x 720 pixels

Conclusions

As you can see for yourself, compression is identical on both Android and iOS when we talk about posts on our profile. Images are resized to a maximum of 1,080 pixels wide or high and videos to 640 pixels. In this sense, the myth that iPhone users can upload content in better quality falls by its own weight, despite the fact that the weight – redundancy is worth – of the compressed files uploaded from an iPhone is slightly higher. It is too small a figure that cannot be taken into account in terms of quality.

Where there is a more than obvious difference is in the stories. All the shots were taken with the Instagram Stories camera, which is how most users do it. The Android app takes photos with a very, very low weight, while the iOS app seems to upload the photos as it is extracted from the camera. In this sense, we cannot help but remember Snapchat, which in the iPhone app extracts the image directly from the camera, while in Android it makes a screenshot of what the camera gets, greatly reducing its quality. Stories uploaded from iPhone look better, or at least that is how we perceive it.

Finally, when it comes to uploading photos taken with an external camera, it is clear that the image processing is much better on the iPhone than on Android. You can clearly see that the colors of the image uploaded from the Galaxy S7 are duller, the details are scarcer and the photo is more pixelated. The one uploaded with the iPhone respects the original file better and, in short, looks better. Point for the iPhone, unfortunately.

In summary:

  • Is there compression?: Yes, and very beast
  • Are there differences in the compression of iPhone and Android?: Not.
  • Are Stories uploaded from an iPhone better than from an Android?: Yes, although the difference does not affect day to day.
  • Do images taken with a camera look better if they are uploaded with an iPhone instead of with an Android?: Yes, without a doubt.